Category: Equity

Doctor, Doctor, Teacher, Teacher…what do you say? I have a bad case of…..

Gather facts before you react!

“Don’t presume learning lost to Covid, ” says John Hattie. “While the pandemic will have created some gaps in knowledge, the author and academic warns teachers against making assumptions when it comes to student progress.”-Simon Lock, March 3, 2021 (tes.com)

The impact of disruption to education we can all acknowledge. Lack of equity and availability of access to technology brought the attention to the needs of improvement. Parental support became an even more significant point as everyone struggled with a balance of work, remote learning and then loss of jobs. Can we acknowledge families and individuals were doing the best they could under these conditions?

The majority of children worked independently in their learning and will have developed skills as a result. Reports on the nightly news reported how schools had a drop in enrollment and we’re having difficulty locating children. Families were working to figure things out as the pandemic touched every life differently.

When all of our schools open the doors for face-to-face instruction, we also need to open our minds to new possibilities. Things will be different! Let’s not have the expectation we will be back to “normal.” Defining “normal” can be varied from person to person. Let’s embrace the facts we have learned from this pandemic and we will diagnose then treat each individual. No prejudgement, labels or categories assigned.

“For example, this notion of self-regulation where you know how to monitor your progress and what to do next; I think some teachers are going to be very surprised that some kids have those skills,” Hattie says. “But in many classrooms they’re not allowed to use them, because teachers won’t release responsibility.”-John Hattie

In previous writings, I have stated my belief in the importance of student control of learning. “Education is something we do with children, not to them.”-Brenda Yoho. When we focus on expectations, strategies, strengths, and areas to improve, it develops support for the learner, not the outcomes. Learners understanding of how to respond when they do not know is a skillset with lifetime value.

The importance of how you approach back to school face to face instruction is critical to propel student learning forward and not back. Time is precious as we know and losing any of it with wasted strategies and plans, will not provide our learners with the push they need. Make solid plans now and know students are ready!

Thank you for being part of the solution daily! Helping learners grow to the next level on their journey.

This is for you! #Bethesolutiondaily

Finding Facts, Adding Value to what you need as you read!

Books always surround me! They are everywhere! I have highlighted, tagged and read some of my books so much they are falling apart! My signed copy of Teaching with Poverty in Mind by Eric Jensen has pages falling out.

I consult often with others for feedback. Let’s face it don’t we all need it! I don’t care what kind I get right now just anything to help me know if what I am doing is helping someone.

So I sent an email to Daniel Bauer. He does not know me. Yes, I send things to people I don’t know; how else will you grow if you don’t ask. He answered with a blog post. Who knew that is what he would do? He helped me, and I am sure others who may be afraid to ask, don’t be! Here is the blog link. https://t.co/Xie8xgOCnI

I have asked a few others, and they confirm the same things from his blog. Be real, Focus on service, Be consistent, write for yourself first, and then that one person! Most importantly, never take yourself too seriously!

You are the reason I write! I have nothing I am selling but giving. My hope someday is to publish my book but not to gain profits or fame. It is to help you! My career ended before I wanted because of one day, one choice, and one crash, leaving injuries to last a lifetime. I miss children, teachers, leaders, parents, and community members. I loved being a principal and part of education!

Now I will organize a time daily the blog post will come out to know when to expect it. The blog post will be posted daily at 9:30 a.m. Central Time. We will see if that time works for everyone. I will provide you with current information on topics to help leaders and teachers support each other and the children they serve. We will address Poverty, Social-Emotional Learning, Mental Health, Equity, and how to move forward in this sea of confusion from the global pandemic. Let’s get started!

In Federal Poverty Threshold, Who really is poor in America by Kimberly Amadeo https://www.thebalance.com/federal-poverty-threshold-3305793

I found some things to help us on our journey of learning, reflection, review and action. In order to be the solution, you have to identify the problem, reflect on what has been done, what is working, and create an action plan. Then face the problem and take action. Do it!

Key Takeaways from Who really is poor in America

  • The federal poverty threshold is the measurement of poverty in America, based on several economic factors having to do with total family income.
  • According to the U.S. Census, the official poverty rate in 2019 was 10.5%.
  • Over 41% of those living in poverty were white, while about 28% were Hispanic, 24% were Black, and 4% were Asian.
  • Research shows there is a high correlation between education and income.

The effects of the global pandemic have caused many changes in our families across our nation. In your school, district or community, have you seen an increase in the number of people without jobs? Business closings? Do you have a reduction in student enrollment? Why? Do you have an increased number of homelessness?

As you reflect on the changes in your area, what are steps that have been taken to help locally? “Common issues in low-income families include: depression, chemical dependence, and hectic work schedules-all factors that interfere with the healthy attachments that foster children’s self-esteem, sense of mastery of their environment, and optimistic attitudes.”-Eric Jenson

Poor children often feel isolated; they drop out of school and do not perform well academically because of their stressors. Our children are all facing that during this pandemic as they have been isolated at various lengths of times, lacked excitement in learning with issues in technology, feeling stress from family work or no work, and uncertainty in safety as health and violence are in question.

Unemployment Surge 

In April 2020, the U.S. economy lost an astonishing 20.8 million jobs.11 Many states required non-essential businesses to shut down. Bars, restaurants, and hotels suffered the most, as people stopped traveling and restaurants could only offer take-out and delivery. Hospitals lost jobs as they stopped elective procedures to make way for COVID-19 patients. Retail also suffered as shoppers moved online.

Prior to the shutdown, the economy was adding around 200,000 jobs a month. It needs about 150,000 new jobs each month to keep expanding.

Job losses sent the April unemployment rate skyrocketing to 14.7%. It remained in the double digits until August, ending the year at. 6.7%12

The Fed projects that unemployment will fall to a healthy 5.0% in 2021.9

Reference for additional information: https://www.thebalance.com/recession-2020-4846657#:~:text=The%202020%20recession%20is%20the,added%20back%20into%20the%20economy.

ACTION

In order to change, we must change- Identity your problems and let’s face them

Brains can change! I suffer from a Traumatic Brain Injury and was expected to not…. let’s not go there because I can so can they! Begin a plan not on remediation for children but for discovery! Discover where they are and keep going!

Implementation of SHARE! This comes from Eric Jensen in his book Teaching with Poverty in Mind.

Support the Whole Child

Hard Data

Accountability

Relationship Building

Enrichment Mind-Set

We will continue with more facts, tools and resources as we continue! Thank you for being the solution daily!