Tag: #Resurces

Wednesday Words, they matter!

#Bethesolutiondaily

I want to give you a peace of mind. No, not a piece of mind! Words and their usage can be confusing. When you add-in tone, body language and biases, then it rises to a deeper level.

Language used in any setting influences those who are receiving the communication. They can recognize the power in the words from the tone, word choice, body language combined with the individual’s position.

Teachers in a class setting can influence the learners they serve in many ways: the actions, tones, and word choices. Students’ identities as learners are influenced by the power the learner gives to the teacher. Student demeanor, engagement, and outlook can change based on the language used by the teacher. There will always be exceptions and variables, but our responsibility is to set the standard high for communication to be at a level of positivity.

Knowing the responsibility, we have placed on the teaching staff to build relationships with students and families and focusing on the language of positivity. We as leaders need to do the same. How does our language help feed our staff with the fuel they need to feedback to their students as they work to feed up?

In my previous blogs I have talked about communication. Think about the last communication you had with staff? Was it a memo? An evaluation discussion? How about an email or text? What about that social media post?

I hope you are able to reflect and look at all of your forms of communication to see how others may feel, react, respond and react to your communications. Now think about communications you receive. Ask yourself the same questions. Language, words spoken, words heard, body and tone all play essential parts in our communication.

I am a firm believer in teaching vocabulary to students. Utilize positive talk for a supportive and encouraging climate. As an evaluator, it is essential to provide feedback vital to improvement. Feedback that feeds the moral, provides guidance and self-worth.

I am providing some links to additional articles from ASCD to continue your look at language. In addition, Larry Bell provided many years ago 12 powerful words students should know in order to understand questions on assessments. Vocabulary is essential for students. We will look at that topic more on a future blog.

My final piece is a poem by Charles Osgood. How many times have we responded to a question with “pretty good”? Words matter! Be careful not to settle for “pretty good.”

Resources@bethesolutiondaily

https://www.larry-bell.com 12 powerful words

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept08/vol66/num01/The-Power-of-Our-Words.aspx

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/feb14/vol71/num05/Words-That-Encourage.aspx

Pretty Good by Charles Osgood

There once was a pretty good student
Who sat in a pretty good class
And was taught by a pretty good teacher
Who always let pretty good pass.
He wasn’t terrific at reading,
He wasn’t a whiz-bang at math,
But for him, education was leading
Straight down a pretty good path.
He didn’t find school too exciting,
But he wanted to do pretty well,
And he did have some trouble with writing
Since nobody taught him to spell.
When doing arithmetic problems,
Pretty good was regarded as fine.
5+5 needn’t always add up to be 10;
A pretty good answer was 9.
The pretty good class that he sat in
Was part of a pretty good school,
And the student was not an exception:
On the contrary, he was the rule.
The pretty good school that he went to
Was there in a pretty good town,
And nobody there seemed to notice
He could not tell a verb from a noun.
The pretty good student in fact was
Part of a pretty good mob.
And the first time he knew what he lacked was
When he looked for a pretty good job.
It was then, when he sought a position,
He discovered that life could be tough,
And he soon had a sneaking suspicion
Pretty good might not be good enough.
The pretty good town in our story
Was part of a pretty good state
Which had pretty good aspirations
And prayed for a pretty good fate.
There once was a pretty good nation
Pretty proud of the greatness it had,
Which learned much too late,
If you want to be great,
Pretty good is, in fact, pretty bad.

Time to talk about your why and Research

#Bethesolutiondaily

Data, data and more data. Data-driven decision making is what drives improvement. Are we doing this? Are we seeing results? Do we hear our teams saying, “we are data rich and information poor”? Is the data we are collecting the right data? Is it the data making the difference?

Professor John Hattie has conducted research, written several books, completed many talks, and has shared significant findings to help all educators. I had the honor of listening to him talk again last night and have enjoyed all of my learning from him the past few years. His goal of finding the greatest impact on student achievement provided us with Visible Learning.

Visible Learning research identified over 250 factors influencing student achievement. He calculated an average effect size of these factors to find 0.4 as a marker for one-year growth.

Education research can feel overwhelming and can be something people want to avoid. The work has been done for us by Hattie; now we need to look at where we are in order to make decisions to improve. How to apply the work he has done with our why?

Visible Learning research provided a great deal of information for us to examine. The first influence to focus on is how teachers think about learning and the impact of their role.

“The important thing for successful leaders is not what they do; much more important is how and why they do what they do.” -Simon Sinek—understanding the “why” is essential in all we do in and out of the classroom. When the “why” drives what we are doing, outcomes are different. It is the passion, heart, inspiration, and foundation of our core values driving our purpose. Please watch as Simon Sinek explains the why.

https://www.ted.com/talks simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

The book 10 Mindframes for Visible Learning Teaching for Success by John Hattie and Klaus Zierer is an excellent choice for your instructional team. The chapters are designed with the ten mind frames, a reflection piece, questions at the conclusion, and a checklist. Investing in the time with your instructional team is essential in feeding forward positive results.

Education is something we do with children not to them. Helping teachers understand their impact and guiding students into their ownership in learning is my goal as we work together through these blogs.

Next week during our Tuesday Talk, we will focus more on teaching and learning with Visible Learning. I will leave you with additional resources to have to begin your discussions with teams. Please drop me a comment if you have specific areas you want to focus on, questions you have or ideas. I will get the information you need to help you and your team.

Thank you for #Bethesolutiondaily

Resources for Visible Learning

https://www.visiblelearningmetax.com/

https://visible-learning.org/

https://us.corwin.com/en-us/nam/visible-learning

Finding Focus for Solutions- Suicide Prevention


Is the Pandemic Fueling A rise In Suicide Attempts Among kids? Shots-Health News: NPR

A cluster of suicides in Las Vegas, plus a troubling rise in youth suicide attempts observed in ER nationwide, is raising fears that the pandemic is fueling a children’s mental health crisis- Read on at https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962060105/child-psychiatrists-warn-that-the-pandemic-may-be-driving-up-kids-suicide-risk?s=09

Suicide Prevention is a priority for me, as I know it is for so many others. This pandemic has highlighted the importance of mental health and recognizes the need to support schools in helping to meet all of the needs of the students they serve.

If you have lost someone to suicide, you understand the emotions and questions it brings. I cannot state the names of those I have lost; I can only share the countless conversations held over decades regarding possible suicide, school-wide campaigns to prevent suicide, and strategies to use for self-care.

Running to me were two young sisters with tears flowing, arms wrapping around me and a mother looking at me with eyes full of sadness. Next to the mother was the beautiful youngest daughter, the sister who always reminded me she did not get to have me as a teacher like her sisters. Serving as Assistant Principal, for a short time before the family had moved away, I felt the pain for the family.

She had always dealt with low self-esteem, bullying, and not finding where she fits in. I had talked a great deal with all of them about strategies, things to do, and help to seek out. Why at age 16? Questions and emotions come flooding in.

It is essential to talk with, watch for signs, look for changes, monitor computer usage, and many other differences you see in your child. There is not a magic age number as this pandemic is showing suicide rates at very young ages. Please continue reading on ways you can help—advocate for more services for our children.

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/02/02/962185779/make-space-listen-offer-hope-how-to-help-a-child-at-risk-of-suicide?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social

Tell us Thursday! No, I don’t think so!

“Take these test papers home and have a parent sign them. Bring them back and place on my desk tomorrow. Make sure your parents go over these tests with you.”

Sally took her test paper from the teacher and saw the big red F. It was math, and she was not doing so well after being gone for her grandmother’s illness and funeral. It was tough seeing her grandmother so sick in the hospital and then dying.

Sally took the paper home. Her dad worked the second shift, so it was just her and her mom. She took out the math test and told her mom all about it. Math was not her mother’s subject either but she signed the test to put in her book bag.

The next morning after the family breakfast, it was off to school. Dad had to go back to work early for overtime, so he was leaving too.

Sally took out her things and then walked up to place the test on the teacher’s desk. As she was walking back to her seat she heard.

“Sally, what in the world is this. You did not have your mother sign this. This looks like you tried to sign your mother’s name. Get out to the hallway now!”

Everyone was looking at her. She went to the hallway as the teacher followed. The teacher went to the classroom next door and was telling her I had signed my mother’s name to my test. I need you to watch my class so I can go down to call home.

“Call home? Oh no, she can’t call home. This will be horrible for my mom. How embarrassing for my mom.”

“Please, don’t call home.”

Too late, you should have thought about that before you lied and cheated. Now sit here with your head against the wall.

Both classrooms were looking at Sally as tears fell from her eyes. The tears were for her mother not for herself, but no one asked; they were telling. If the teacher would have asked Sally privately the true story could have been told. It would have saved the humiliation of many that day!

The truth behind this story is about a young 3rd-grade girl who was very shy and kept to herself. Her mother did sign the test paper but the teacher thought it was a forged signature because of all the eraser marks.

See, my parents did not have an education, but they respected it. Teachers were important people. My mother had the most beautiful handwriting; she could only write her name. She wanted it to be perfect for the teacher. This is why it was erased so many times. It was going to the teacher so it needed to be perfect.

I did not want the teacher to call home because I did not want my mom to be embarrassed. She had cried so much and lost her mom; she did not need the teacher yelling at her too. I did not want the teacher to think poorly of my mom because she did not have an education. She was the best mom anyone could ask for.

My older sister was at home when the teacher called. I was so thankful she came to the school. She asked if I wanted to go home and I did. The teacher looked at me but never apologized for anything to me. Maybe she was humiliated. Probably not as I look back. Still, I wouldn’t say I like math because of that dumb math test!

This real story in my life was brought back to my attention as I read Humble Inquiry by Edgar Schein. The book begins by pointing out three kinds of humility. The three kinds are: Basic humility, Optional humility, and Here-and-now humility.

Basic humility is a social position people are born into. Optional humility is a status achieved by accomplishments in their life that are more than we have, so we respect or envy them. Here-and-now humility is a temporary feeling when we are dependent on another for a task, need, or support. An example would be a doctor in an operating room with several different people. They could be of varying status levels. They depend on each other to complete the surgery with success.

I was worried that my mom would be humiliated (embarrassed). She thought highly of the teacher and would not want to be called out about her signature. The teacher had Optimal humility.

I am looking forward to the second edition of Humble Inquiry! Please order your copy now on Amazon! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1523092629?pf_rd_r=H69DKNZTN8Y17PG0603Q&pf_rd_p=5ae2c7f8-e0c6-4f35-9071-dc3240e894a8&pd_rd_r=38dbd04c-aaa7-4108-9336-cb2be3ecde88&pd_rd_w=gLZQ0&pd_rd_wg=6yhst&ref_=pd_gw_unk

In our society in general, we do a great deal of telling. My story is from many years ago, but it is still relevant. Do we ask the right questions? Most importantly, do we listen? Do we acknowledge?

I have lots of books about communication. I believe this is a skill needing improvement! The first step to better communication is Humble Inquiry as we ask the right questions and move away from just telling.

Humble yourself today as you begin to be the solution daily.

Words of Wisdom-Wednesday

Today is a gift; unwrap it with care as you share with others. It will continue to provide if you are wise. ~B.Yoho

Authors spend many hours filling blank pages with words they hope will inspire, engage, create feelings, promote innovation, and so much more. It is through this work they desire feedback to validate and encourage them to continue to produce more for us to consume and enjoy.

Do you have a favorite author, quote, or individual who provides the spark you need to lift you? Have you ever considered yourself as an individual who does that for someone else? Another question, do you provide opportunities for others to share their words of wisdom?

My life journey has given me opportunities to recognize the importance of every day. I have always said today is a gift be careful about how you unwrap it. Students would look at me with a puzzled look. When they did, this allowed me to explain my thought. It goes like this:

This morning when you woke up, it was your gift to start the day. Maybe it greeted you with bright sunlight, new snow, or dark rain clouds. Right then, you had a choice in how you were going to begin to unwrap your day. Everything is about the choices you make. We have no control of the weather, but we do control how we react. So do you greet with a smile to breakthrough any clouds, a frown to block out the sunlight, or tears to add to the muddy pathways?

How you start to unwrap your day helps to keep it going smoothly! Have you ever had a gift with too much tape or hard to get open? Some days are just like those gifts! So you tackle those with additional tools to help you make adjustments. Sometimes you ask for help, look at it from a different angle, or take a break and deep breath to try again.

The most important thing to remember is, this day is your gift. You can control the choices you make today because they can help or hurt tomorrow’s gift.

Then I always summed up my story with my famous phrase they could all repeat. You can choose to be part of the problem or part of the solution, the choice is always mine to make.

You can be part of the problem or part of the solution;
the choice is yours to make

It is my hope people will begin to share with me, connect with me, and I can help lift them. I believe we have great leaders, teachers, and children. I want to help with the mindset of we can.

http://bethesolution.com